On the Hunt: Drones in China Looking for Cheaters

As students start to feel the pressure of taking the annual Gaokao 高考 entrance exam, drones are in the sky looking for cheaters.

Feature image provided by Business Insider

The score a student receives on the Gaokao 高考 entrance exam determines if he/she can go to a university in China. Since the score is pretty much the only thing that matters, high school graduates study for months in preparation. Approximately 9 million students take the test.

The test takes two days to complete, covering subjects such as Chinese language and literature, mathematics, a foreign language (often English), and one or more subjects of the student’s choice (for example: social studies/politics, physics, history, biology, or chemistry).

So the pressure to do well is tremendous, sometimes unbearable, and students succumb to cheating on the exam. According to ABC News, 23 people were arrested and more than 80 were punished since May 2014 for cheating. Cheating tactics include hiring surrogate test-takers (someone pretending to be the student and taking the test), using wireless equipment to relay answers, or buying answers to the test.

Glasses containing a hidden camera and a coin with a tiny receiver. Image provided by Business Insider. Click here to view more images of the Gaokao.
Glasses containing a hidden camera and a coin with a tiny receiver. Image provided by Business Insider. Click here to view more images of the Gaokao.

This year, however, teachers and test administrators in central China decided to have drones patrol classrooms searching for wireless signals. Each drone can stay in the air for about 30 minutes.

Watch this video to learn more


ABC US News | World News

[typography font=”Patrick Hand” size=”24″ size_format=”px”]Have you taken the Gaokao? What was your experience like? Share via social media or comment below.[/typography]

 

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