?
?

What I Miss About Korea

YeRim Kang studying at Anderson University shares the top three things he misses about his home country of Korea.

1. Korean pop culture (K-pop)

There is no doubt that Korean pop culture (affectionately called K-pop) and drama have become an international phenomenon. It is gaining popularity in American pop and drama culture, with enthusiastic fans such as Perez Hilton. I myself have met American friends in college who are crazy fans of Korean idol groups or some romantic comedy dramas. As a Korean international student, I listen to K-pop music in order to stay connected with our generation, as well as to be able to sympathize with the lyrics and simply enjoy music. Dramas as well in the same reason. The global interaction of K-pop and drama have also become a way for Korean Americans to relate to Koreans from the “motherland” halfway across the world. Watching starts and actors/actresses both on and off the stage through YouTube videos has also helped Korean American girls keep up with the latest fashion trends in Korea.

2. Public Transportation

I miss Korea’s convenient public transportation system. Because Korea is a small urbanized country with comparatively dense population, transportation is provided by extensive networks of railways, highways, bus routes, ferry services, and air routes that criss-cross the country. South Korea is actually the third country in the world to operate a commercial maglev train.[1]

3. Fashion

Street fashion has been a trend for quite a while. Because Korea consists many small shops with so many varieties of clothing styles everywhere, people like to express themselves daily by what they wear. Online shopping, markets in subway stations, and downtown areas are all thriving economy buzzing with people looking for their own fashion style. I follow Korean street fashion pages in Facebook in order to keep track of recent trends and fashion items.

Although there are issues regarding the quickly developed country (social issues such as educational pressure, critical suicide rates, and pressure in good-looks), it is an entirely different topic and regardless, it does not change the fact that I am homesick of the urban roads and people from my mother culture.

YeRim’s article was a finalist for our microscholarship! Follow ISV Magazine to learn more.

 

Print Friendly

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

css.php